glumshoe
If you are 35 or younger - and quite often, older - the advice of the old economy does not apply to you. You live in the post-employment economy, where corporations have decided not to pay people. Profits are still high. The money is still there. But not for you. You will work without a raise, benefits, or job security. Survival is now a laudable aspiration.

Quoted from Sarah Kendzior’s “Surviving the Post-Employment Economy

In the United States, nine percent of computer science majors are unemployed, and 14.7 percent of those who hold degrees in information systems have no job. Graduates with degrees in STEM - science, technology, engineering and medicine - are facing record joblessness, with unemployment at more than twice pre-recession levels. The job market for law degree holders continues to erode, with only 55 percent of 2011 law graduates in full-time jobs. Even in the military, that behemoth of the national budget, positions are being eliminated or becoming contingent due to the sequester.

It is not skills or majors that are being devalued. It is people.

Her work is frank, speaking of a reality I hope that will never be mine. At the same time, it gives me a strange comfort to know that I am not alone.

"Higher education is merely a symptom of a broader economic disease. As universities boast record endowments and spend millions on lavish infrastructure, administrators justify poor treatment of faculty by noting that said faculty:

  1. 'choose' to work for poverty wages, and
  2. picked specialisations that give them limited ‘market value’ - ignoring, of course, that almost no one is valued in this market, save those who are reaping its greatest profits.

The college major debate - in which ‘skill’ is increasingly redefined as a specific corporate contribution - extends this inequity to the undergraduate level, defining as worthless both the student’s field of study and the person teaching it.

But when worthlessness is determined by the people handing out - or withholding - monetary worth, we have cause for reassessment.

(via senjukannon)
punlich
t3hsiggy:

nymphamortem:

blue-author:

runnerjive:

thre3dprint:

Open Source Clothing.

Now I feel it imperative to reblog this, because the project seems to have hit a snag: The video they put up has been taken down because of claims of 3rd-party content, whatever whatever corporate lawyer stuff internet throttling stuff. That makes me think that Bennetton or one of the others whose stores were glimpsed in the background got their hooks in Vimeo.So I thought I’d tell you a yarn about how this thing works: You download the open-source plans for the machine. You build it. You download their open-souce clothing-maker program.You enter the desired measurements into the fields (the ones I remember from the video were arm and neck and chest measurements, so I’m sure they have waist and/or hips too)You print out your sweater, or hat, or scarf, or cardigan, or whatever it was that you selected. It takes an hour to print out the sweater, working off of the two yarn spools that you can see in the bottom right corner of this .gifThat’s it. Custom-fit, custom-color clothing in an hour, for the price of yarn. Can you see why one of the clothing companies targetted in the video might have felt threatened enough to force the video to come down?

I know if I sold overpriced manufactured clothes, I’d see this as a looming menace.

I WILL HAVE HAUTE COUTURE

t3hsiggy:

nymphamortem:

blue-author:

runnerjive:

thre3dprint:

Open Source Clothing.

Now I feel it imperative to reblog this, because the project seems to have hit a snag: The video they put up has been taken down because of claims of 3rd-party content, whatever whatever corporate lawyer stuff internet throttling stuff. That makes me think that Bennetton or one of the others whose stores were glimpsed in the background got their hooks in Vimeo.
So I thought I’d tell you a yarn about how this thing works:
You download the open-source plans for the machine.
You build it.
You download their open-souce clothing-maker program.
You enter the desired measurements into the fields (the ones I remember from the video were arm and neck and chest measurements, so I’m sure they have waist and/or hips too)
You print out your sweater, or hat, or scarf, or cardigan, or whatever it was that you selected. It takes an hour to print out the sweater, working off of the two yarn spools that you can see in the bottom right corner of this .gif
That’s it. Custom-fit, custom-color clothing in an hour, for the price of yarn. Can you see why one of the clothing companies targetted in the video might have felt threatened enough to force the video to come down?

I know if I sold overpriced manufactured clothes, I’d see this as a looming menace.

I WILL HAVE HAUTE COUTURE